Saturday, 25 June 2016

Picture Story: Fasting and Eid in Malaysia



Muslims all over the world are fasting for 29-30 days as a part of their religious obligation. The basic rules of fasting and prayers are same no matter which part of the world a muslim lives in but the celebration, decoration, food and clothing depends on the traditions and culture of the country. I love how same religions and festivals have such different manifestations. I decided to do a picture story of some aspects for Ramazan (the holy month of fasting called Puasa in Malay) and Eid (the celebration to mark the end of one month fasting called Raya in Malay). 

Masjid India in Kuala Lumpur - Friday Prayers





Itar or Attar being sold outside the mosque Attar is an essential oil derived from botanical sources
Fasting Muslims listening to Friday Sermon at Masjid India, Kuala Lumpur 




A worker collecting donations for the mosque's administration. Any amount can be given. Charity is also an important religious obligation for Muslims


Leaving the mosque after Friday Prayers. 


Some people engage in extra prayers as the month is Holy.
The man on left is dressed in typical Malay dress



Stalls near the mosque selling prayers and Eid related things 


Caps for men
Buntings to decorate houses and offices for the festival
Prayer mats

In Malaysia, homemade biscuits are sold and exchanged during the fasting month and on Eid
Clothes for Women
Malls are decorated especially for the whole month - KLCC Suria Center Court
Pavilion Mall Center Court 


Gift hampers made of biscuits, chocolates and drinks are being sold at shops. Malaysians present these hampers to each other on Eid
Some Malay foods available at Ramazan Bazars for breaking fast
Refreshing Drinks
Eid Prayers (Photograph from Eid Last Year)

Lemang or Bamboo Rice is a traditional food made of glutinous rice, coconut milk and salt, cooked in a hollowed bamboo stick lined with banana leaves in order to prevent the rice from sticking to the bamboo. This is a specialty during Raya. (Photograph from Eid Last Year)

A little Malay boy on the day of Eid in Malay dress. (Photograph from Eid Last Year)



Colourful smiles and celebrations (Photograph from Eid Last Year)
This year the eid will be celebrated on the 6th or 7th of July depending on the moon. I did a post on the FAQs asked by non Muslims regarding fasting. You can read it here.

All photographs courtesy www.ahsanqureshi.com



24 comments:

  1. They say a photo is worth a thousand words. The photos were great! You know, we have a similar dish to the Lamang in the Philippines. We call it 'suman.' I hope everything goes well with you during this holy season.

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  2. Wow, that's amazing! I like that everyone even the malls are in on it, I think that helps succeed. The mall itself is gorgeous too, I love all of the colors.

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  3. Your pictures really do tell an amazing story. They're all so gorgeous and you can feel how full of life they are!

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  4. We have gone to Malaysia around that time of the year about two years ago and have also witnessed partly how they celebrate Ramazan. It's a great celebration where all people come together to pray.

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  5. I have experienced Ramazan and Eid when I lived in Indonesia for almost a year. I like how families exchange food and gifts during the festivities. Prayer and fasting are truly essential to our soul. I love the photos! Thank you for sharing them. They make me understand and appreciate your faith better.

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  6. We have different beliefs but one in spirit and love. Fasting is the best way in eliminating bad elements in our bloods and clensed the inside of us. Muslims are very patient in fasting, and after fasting time, eat foods altogether.

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  7. You have done such a good job. Photos are amazing! 👍

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  8. The quote saying 'A picture is worth a thousand words' is truly the fact. Your picture speaks it all about the place. Thanks for sharing

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  9. These pictures are really beautiful!

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  10. Thank you for these informative photos which tell an inside story about a religion I am not very familiar with. I have heard of Ramadan but I really have no idea what happens during this month of fasting.

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  11. awesome photos you have there! i always thought the fasting month for our malay friends simply means to not eat during those specific times but actually there's more to it than just with eating food.

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  12. Thank you guys! Really appreciate all the comments and feedback. They act like a fuel to motivate me to do more and better!

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  13. During Ramadan everything changes upside down both in India & UK. In the middle of the night the bazaars and food places are all open with a feast variety of food. Ramadan in UK is more difficult, than I saw in India, as the sun rises so early and doesn't set till very late.

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  14. During Ramadan everything changes upside down both in India & UK. In the middle of the night the bazaars and food places are all open with a feast variety of food. Ramadan in UK is more difficult, than I saw in India, as the sun rises so early and doesn't set till very late.

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  15. Yeah, in some countries due to time it can be very long... But it is festive and has a charm of its own.

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  16. Religion really gives me a vibe I can't explain. A good vibe. It emanates an air of divinity and holiness.

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  17. It's nice see the custom and practices of fasting in Malaysia. You really captured it well in your photos.

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  18. You're right no matter where you are in the world, the process is the same and it's nice to see people sticking to their traditions. I have always been curious about Ramadan, since I believe it's similar to Lent.

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  19. You got many awesome photos and yes Ramadan month is Malaysia is like that. There are many stalls setup or so called as bazaar Ramadan.

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  20. Ramadan brings such a festive mood. Feasting on special yummy delicacies is something even non-Muslims love.

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  21. I love how you are creating awareness for others. Good Job

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  22. I would live to go here someday. Once i finished all my travel assignment this yr will definitely visit here

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  23. so that's how it's done in malaysia.. i'm not really aware of other cultures but i read this i quite leard about their practices.. thanks!

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  24. These people are really awesome and very consistent. I also like the idea how they observe such event of their religion and the sincerity and passion they have towards it, priceless! Oh, the food being sold, I am quite interested with it. Sure, it does taste good!

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